ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
* HEALTH
 AIDS
 Aging
 Alternative
 Cancer
 Children
 Diet & Fitness
 Men
 Women
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  health > alternative > story pageAIDSAgingAlternative MedicineCancerChildrenDiet & FitnessMenWomen

Nonmedicinal treatment of pain gains adherents

Pain Management
Alternative therapies such as self-hypnosis offer new hope for people who suffer from chronic pain  

December 17, 1999
Web posted at: 10:13 p.m. EST (0313 GMT)


In this story:

Self-hypnosis helps patient

Overcoming skepticism

RELATED STORIES, SITES icon



From Medical Correspondent Dr. Steve Salvatore

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Some people who suffer from chronic pain are putting their medications aside and turning to an alternative form of treatment. Hypnosis is becoming a popular option with both patients and doctors.

"Pain management ... more often than not, is not curing pain, but it's helping people who have chronic pain return to a more optimal level of functioning," said Alan Lebovitz of the New York University Medical Center.

Self-hypnosis helps patient

Mehboob Shivji is very aware of how pain is affecting his life. He has a muscular joint disease that leaves him in constant pain.

But living on pain medications and with the side effects they can cause is not acceptable for some patients. So they are willing to try something else.

 VIDEO
VideoCNN's Dr. Steve Salvatore reports on how one patient practices pain management.
Real 28K 80K
Windows Media 28K 80K
 
  MESSAGE BOARD
Power over pain
 

"I do half an hour of self-hypnosis," Shivji said. "And literally I go from not being able to walk much, to being completely fine -- very manageable without taking extra medications."

Lebovitz said, "The way I use hypnosis is teaching patients a relaxation technique. It teaches them to distract themselves from the pain."

He said, "It doesn't work for everybody. Some people it works more easily or better with than other people. But most patients can derive some benefit from hypnosis."

Overcoming skepticism

The National Institutes of Health recognizes hypnosis as a valid alternative therapy for chronic pain.

Shivji says he feels much better after his session, more relaxed and ready to take on the world.

"When I started this I was a big skeptic, I didn't think it would help," Shivji said. "The pain was so severe, and I couldn't take any more medications because I would be too drowsy with narcotics, so I decided to give this a chance.

"And the effect was very dramatic."



RELATED STORIES:
Hospitals try VR techniques for pain management
May 21, 1999
Fighting pain with a vegetarian diet
August 18, 1998
Painful results: Women handle aches better than men
April 8, 1998
Hypnosis

RELATED SITES:
The American Dietetic Association--Your link to nutrition and health!
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

LATEST HEALTH STORIES:
 LATEST HEADLINES:
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.