Skip to main content
Search
Services


 

Return to Transcripts main page

CNN PRESENTS

Encore Presentation: Autism is a World

Aired December 3, 2006 - 14:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(NEWS BREAK)
(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JULIANNA MARGULIES, NARRATOR: My name is Sue Rubin. I am 26 years old. I have written these thoughts about my life because I don't really talk. This is not my voice but these are my words.

I have autism. And until the age of 13, everyone assumed I was also retarded. Now I live on my own with assistance from others.

SUE RUBIN, AUTISTIC WOMAN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Okay, thank you.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I decided to make this film to bring people into my world of autism.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Autism is a world.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sue, can we sit down this morning and remember, we talked about talking about some things this morning. You want to do that?

SUE RUBIN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Now is P-E-R-F-E-C - Now is perfect. Okay.

SUE RUBIN: All right. All right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Can you describe what your world was like before you were able to communicate? Can you describe that for me?

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Autism is a world that is so difficult to explain to someone who is not autistic. Someone who can easily turn off the peculiar movements and actions that take over our bodies.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think I was lost - W-A - in some way. I K-N - I know I was R-E-T-A-R-D - I know I was retarded. M-E-A-N-I - Meaning I acted like my worst N-I-G-H-T-M-A-R-E. Acted like my worst nightmare. Y-E-S. Yes.

RITA RUBIN, SUE RUBIN'S MOTHER: Sue didn't really give us a lot of hope. She did a lot self-abusive behavior. She did a lot of biting of her own hand and arm and she was a head-banger. We had to watch her every single minute. If you weren't watching her it meant she was doing something awful. Something that would break the plumbing or cause a fire or do something dangerous. So there was always tension and it was just moving from one difficult situation to another, from one crisis to another.

As a parent it is the most painful thing you can imagine, to see your child hitting herself and throwing her head against the car window or throwing her head against the table or on a concrete floor. It is horrible to have to watch your own child hurt herself that way.

SUE RUBIN: Yeah.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Jackie (ph) has been a saving grace in my tough times.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Are you ready to have lunch?

SUE RUBIN: Yeah.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: She is my neighbor and has been my psychologist for all these years. She has helped me negotiate the train wreck of adolescence and helped me control my killer autism behaviors.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This is something, Sue, that you asked for and we got for you. When the impulse to bang your head was very, very strong and you couldn't make it into the bedroom, you would ask for helmet, put that on, and participate in that to keep your head safe. And what is important to know about that is you requested and you also take it off when you know those impulses are too strong.

So where are we going now?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Well, come on, I'm not going to take it.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I need a support person with me 24 hours a day to assist me with daily life. Cleaning house, shopping, studying and visiting family.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Oh my gosh.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Each Friday, Lusanne (ph) drops be off at my parents' house in time for dinner.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Go ahead.

SUE RUBIN: Grandma, grandma, grandma.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You want to go to grandma's?

SUE RUBIN: Want to go to grandma.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Grandma is going to come here. Juanita will drop her off. Okay?

SUE RUBIN: All right. UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That was a good sentence.

SUE RUBIN: Okay.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Okay.

BOB RUBIN, SUE RUBIN'S FATHER: Is that like a slip you're wearing? Aren't you supposed to wear something on top of that? Or is that the way people dress these days? I look at your skirt there and it seems like it's invisible.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: When I wasn't able to communicate, actually I was a non-person, yet I was always treated well.

SUE RUBIN: Hamotzi lechem min haaretz.

RITA RUBIN: Amen.

BOB RUBIN: Amen.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Everyone in my family and at school were great at including me. Socially, intellectually, culturally and personally. I have been the most blessed with parents who support me.

BOB RUBIN: Sue, have you been following all the propositions that we have to be voting on next Tuesday? I know that you vote absentee ballot pretty often so maybe you have already done it.

SUE RUBIN: Yeah.

RITA RUBIN: They are decidedly confusing. It is really hard, you ...

JULIANNA MARGULIES: One thing I have never felt is aloneness. Although at times retreating into my own world, there has always been someone there to pull me out.

RITA RUBIN: Sue, this way. Out this way.

SUE RUBIN: Yeah.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I am nervous about meeting Dr. Margaret Bowman today and the emotion overwhelms me.

DR. MARGARET BOWMAN, HARVARD NEUROLOGIST: Hi Sue. How are you?

JULIANNA MARGULIES: She is an expert on the neurobiology of autism at Harvard. I want to know why I do weird, awful autistic things I don't want to do.

BOWMAN: Want to come down and see me a few minutes.

SUE RUBIN: A button, a button, a button.

BOWMAN: Sue, why don't we get started with the questions that you have programmed in? SYNTHESIZED VOICE: What is autism?

BOWMAN: Well, that's a very good question and we don't have all the answers but basically we believe that it has something to do with how the brain is wired in certain parts that have to do with emotion, behavior, memory and learning. And how you anticipate and handle language, and there are parts of the brain, like yours, that are wired extremely well and you are very bright and there are parts of the brain that don't quite work as well as you'd like them to.

And we are stilling trying to find out why that is and what we can do about it.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I knowingly contribute to my looking retarded by carrying around a plastic spoon. But spoons are my comfort. I cannot explain how or why I need them, I just do.

RITA RUBIN: When Sue was four we took her to UCLA and I asked the doctor there, she was actually a psychologist, if Sue could have autistic tendencies and so she watched Sue play and observed her and she said, "Forget about the tendencies. She is really autistic."

We knew that she would be retarded and we knew we didn't want her in an institution and we knew that she would be educated in special day classes with other people with severe handicaps and we knew that if she got a job when she was an adult, it would be something like cleaning tables off or something like that, that retarded people do.

Every year she got older and her mental age just stayed the same, which was at about two and a half. So by the time she was 13 she still had a mental age of about two and a half so that is what we thought. We believed that.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I certainly understand why I was assumed to be retarded. All of my very awkward movements and all my nonsense sounds made me appear retarded. Perhaps I was. Voices floated over me. I heard sounds but not words. It wasn't until I had a communication system that I was able to make sense out of the sounds.

When I was 13, Jackie, my educational psychologist, called my mother and said that she had seen someone with autism, who was like me, start to communicate using a keyboard in support.

It's called facilitated communication.

RITA RUBIN: So we asked her if she could find the letters in her name. We would hold her hand and her arm back and she would be pushing forward and then she would just pick out the letters, and she would find the S, and we would pull her hand back and she would go to the next letter. And she did. She found S-U-S-I-E and so we were really kind of amazed, but then I thought, well, big deal, she has been seeing "Susie" every single day of her life written on her desk in big letters and she is just copying what she remembers having seen.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Progress was slow at first. I was a terrible subject because of my behaviors, but my mom insisted that I practice every day. As I began to type, my mind began to wake up.

RITA RUBIN: This is four months later. It was February 16th. I asked her if she could type three vegetables. And you can see it was really difficult for her to get anything and it just looked like gibberish to me.

I saw that she was doing S-P, S-I, S-P-I, and so I said to her, do you mean spinach. And then she got it. She typed "spinach." And then I said to her one more and you can go. She typed "kale." K-A-L- E. I have no idea where that came from because I never buy kale. I don't like kale. I don't make kale. She never had kale. But anyway, she typed kale.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You want some spinach?

SUE RUBIN: No.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Okay.

SUE RUBIN: No.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Which one? The little one?

SUE RUBIN: Yeah.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Oh yeah, cheese. Which one do you want? Just one okay?

SUE RUBIN: All right.

RITA RUBIN: When she started communicating, she was reassessed and she had a another psychological examination and, where before she had tested at the two and a half year level, which is about a 29 I.Q. for someone who is 13, she ended up testing 133 I.Q. So when it came time for her to go to high school, we knew she had to be in regular classes in an academic program.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: I was lost in autism for 13 years. How could my brain lie fallow for so long and wake up in a few weeks?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Do you think you weren't thinking about anything in those 13 years or do you think that you were picking up information even, just very quietly.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: I assume I was storing information.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Do I get to ask you questions some of these times?

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Not yet.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Oh, okay, all right.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I am a junior at Whittier College, majoring in history. I attend classes with Ashley (ph), my friend and support staff.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Okay, you ready to go to type.

SUE RUBIN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: One.

SUE RUBIN: One.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Two.

SUE RUBIN: Two.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Three.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Ashley takes notes for me and is available when I want to communicate.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Randy Caldera (ph), Jennifer Westlake (ph), Mike Rozeek (ph), Chris Shaw (ph), Sue Rubin ...

SUE RUBIN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Suli Vega (ph).

The first we are going to do is we are going to start talking a little about ideologies and philosophies that were brought into play by the arrival of colonialism, first, and then the rise of the nationalist movement in various parts of the Arab World.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Autism is a constant struggle. It takes every ounce of energy I have to sit somewhat quietly during a two hour lecture.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: ... known as nationalist movements.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I love learning, yet being looked upon as feeble-minded is something I have been forced to endure my whole life.

Actually, in the times I am not fully-engaged in school, I find I am more susceptible to awful autism.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Sue, do you know what Sharia is? What's Sharia?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I-S-L-A-M-I-C, Islamic, P-R-I-N-C-I-P-L-E O-F ...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Just two words. She has to tell me the whole thing, yeah?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: L-A-W. Islamic principle or foundation of the law.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Very good. JULIANNA MARGULIES: When I watch water I am zoning out and letting the autistic part of my brain take over. My mind goes blank and I stop thinking.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think I am going to let you read the Egypt real quick before I ask you all these questions.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Ashley and I have a dear friendship that has spanned 12 great years and many more to come. She is a true friend and both loves and antagonizes me like the sister I never had.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I want you to focus this time.

SUE RUBIN: Okay.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I saw your eyes all over the place.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: She has worked with me as school support and has been a pillar of my home life for seven years.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Okay. I am not doing this until you are ready, because otherwise this is a waste of my time and it is a waste of your time.

Are you turning one page at a time or two? Don't get sneaky.

SUE RUBIN: All right.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: But now this is her last semester with me and I am worried about her leaving.

SUE RUBIN: Doodie. Doodie.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Leave it alone, please.

SUE RUBIN: Funny.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You're really not that funny. Seven years later, not that funny.

SUE RUBIN: Funny.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Now come on. As soon as we're done with two more, we can take a break from this.

SUE RUBIN: All right. All right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: All right.

SUE RUBIN: (unintelligible)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sometimes the visual cues I get from you, like your facial expression, Sue, you are looking away or you are making a face or you are doing something. Are you aware of the disconnect between your facial expressions and how you are communicating? SUE RUBIN: I'm very funny. Funny.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I find this hard to talk about. That's why I laugh.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I am very aware. A-N-D - it bothers me that I am unable to S-H-O - that I am unable to show E-M-O-T-I-O-N-S. That I am unable to show emotions. Finish the word. Facial expressions.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: All right. What do you need for a salad?

What else?

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Funds from In-Home Support Services allow me and others like me to be assisted by staff. They help me with daily living skills such as washing and dressing, and errands like grocery shopping and doctor's visits.

The paperwork is a complicated ordeal.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sue. Let's pay your bills, Sue. So why don't you bring me your checkbook and your purse, please?

RITA RUBIN: Sue's financial situation is kind of put together in a lot of different ways. It is very precarious. She gets SSI, which is Supplemental Security Income. She is also a Section 8 renter, and that's a federal program from HUD that is administered through the County of Los Angeles. And she gets 24 hour protective services because she really can't be on her own. If there were a fire or something we can't depend on her getting her body organized to actually get out the door. Or to dial 911. She can't do those things.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Ready?

SUE RUBIN: Ready. A-one.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Now it's Danny's shift. He is my outlet for fun.

SUE RUBIN: Bye-bye.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Let's get out of here.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: We both love betting on the horses.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Look at the horses. What color is it?

SUE RUBIN: White.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That's a nice horse.

SUE RUBIN: Want to buy ... UNIDENTIIFIED MALE: Which one do you want to buy?

SUE RUBIN: White one.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: White one? (unintelligible) race, Susie.

See all these turns (ph)?

SUE RUBIN: Yeah.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Do you see a problem? The five horse ...

Yes?

SUE RUBIN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I love going to the race track because it is a place where I can blend in with the crowd and appear normal. Everyone is looking at the horses and not at me.

SUE RUBIN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hey, a winner, winner, huh?

SUE RUBIN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: $20 and a dime.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Get your money, Suse. Let's get out of here.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hey, daydreamer, let's go.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: The last four years I have been blessed to have Lusanne (ph) in my life as support staff.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We are going to go. We're going to go to Trader Joe's ...

JULIANNA MARGULIES: I have been asked to give a speech next month at a conference.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Can you put your spoons right here so we can - just put the spoons there so where you are done you can have them back. Please?

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Writing these presentations is an arduous process.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Susie. I won't have it. Remember, the spoons are over there, you won't get them back unless you sit quietly and do this.

Many people think living with autism is difficult.

SUE RUBIN: (unintelligible)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Try getting into college.

Many people think living with autism is difficult. Try getting into college.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Today I am giving my presentation at Syracuse University's Conference of Educators and People with Autism.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just relax.

SUE RUBIN: Unintelligible.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sue, Sue, Sue.

One. Two. Three. Clear.

Okay let's go. One, two, three, let's go.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: My goal is to enlighten individuals to the potential of their own voices.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nervous? I can feel it in your hand. Relax, relax, relax. It is show time, lady. One, two, three. We're starting.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Miss Nerieve (ph), go ahead and read Sue's prepared presentation.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Many people think living with autism is difficult. Try getting into college. Some of the toughest challenges I have faced have been right on the college campus. One such challenge is proving to people that I am a capable student.

My name is Sue Rubin. I am a student with autism at Whittier College and am currently enrolled in my junior year.

I was a typical 19 year old train wreck. I feared leaving the nest, the uncertainties of peer acceptance and the dreaded workload of college homework. My acceptance into Whittier College eased some of my fears because it allowed me to stay in the area in which I am familiar, stay close to my parents and, as equally as important, remain in the community-based services that aided me throughout my school years.

It is very difficult to fight echolalia, odd behaviors and uncontrollable sounds and movements. In the first couple of years of college, I not only had to fight autism, but I also had to prove I was a capable student. As time went on, I have to fight less and less.

We would like to take any questions that anyone may have.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Sue, may I enquire what your profession of life will be? UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I would like to A-D-V-O-C-A-T-E. Advocate.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Advocate.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And write.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Write.

I would like to advocate and write for a newspaper.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I would like to advocate and write for a newspaper.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: When will you be available as a counselor to other students with autism starting college? I think I am going to need lots of caring support from someone who has gone before me.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Y-O-U.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: You.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: C-A-N. You can.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Can.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You can count on ...

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: You can count on me, Tyler.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You can count on me, Tyler.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sue, you were awesome, as always.

SUE RUBIN: Eh.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It's always debatable.

SUE RUBIN: (unintelligible)

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Autism is not a social way of life. Many times solitude is one's best friend. Other times it can be my own worst enemy, spinning me into an autistic mind frame.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: (unintelligible)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You have to drink it first. Then you'll be singing dodadees (ph). Drink it.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No, we're sipping tonight. Tonight we're sipping.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You are very scared and anxious about the thought of Ashley leaving. Yeah. That's a worry. A real worry. But we'll take it one day at a time. Okay. There is some things in your life that are going to be permanent, like your family, and friends like Janine and the fact that I live across the street. I am not going anywhere, okay? Ashley has been with you almost six or seven years now. I mean, you would even admit it is time for her to move on.

But at the same time, that's scary because you guys have been together for so long.

You're turning away from me because this is emotional, huh.

SUE RUBIN: Later.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Later. Uh-huh.

SUE RUBIN: Later, later.

Do-da-dee (ph).

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Silence. It's golden.

SUE RUBIN: Do-da-dee.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

Whittier College.

SUE RUBIN: Yeah.

(unintelligible)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A whisper, please.

Okay. I have chosen Latin America.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Lusanne (ph) and I are meeting with Professor Orosco to discuss the completion of my history major. He is my mentor.

JOSE OROSCO, WHITTIER COLLEGE HISTORY PROFESSOR: You Sue, you need to take three courses that are three 300 level courses in Latin America. I know your adviser is Dick Archer, and since Professor Archer is retiring this year, I would be happy to be your adviser.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That is exactly what I want. I've enjoyed Dr. Archer's feedback but agree with you.

OROSCO: Okay. Good.

SUE RUBIN: Funny.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Finish. That's right.

Did you finish the Luis Moreno (ph) book?

OROSCO: That's the book that I was working on. Oh, you remembered. Sue, good job. Let me - when I get it sort of polished up it is almost there. I will give you a copy.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That would be awesome.

OROSCO: I'll give you a copy.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Really (unintelligible) because non-verbal autistic people are not given an opportunity to show their intelligence. Real hate it (ph) because non-verbal autistic people are not given an opportunity to show their intelligence.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You are absolutely right. Many years ago, the word was that approximately 75 percent of the folks on the autism spectrum were functioning in the mentally retarded range and clearly that is far too high.

BOWMAN: Sue, knowing people like you who can communicate so well and who are clearly very bright I think has forced me as a researcher to think about what we think we know or thought we knew about autism.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Sadly, you don't have all the answers.

BOWMAN: Sadly, we don't, Sue. Would be nice. I wish I did.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look it over and you tell me which you want to start with.

SUE RUBIN: All right.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: Jeanine (ph) is the coordinator of my supported living program. I am meeting with everyone to day to talk about my staff changes.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sue, we need to talk about your transition her with Lusanne (ph) and Ashley leaving.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What the plan is is to contact people in various agencies that are serving adults in our area.

Sue, come on, this is important.

SUE RUBIN: No.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Walk.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Come on, sweetie sit down.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I am just scared.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Scared.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I am just scared of what - and I just don't - I just don't what.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Fix it. UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You have three periods. Do you really need them?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sue, fix it.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: (unintelligible)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Come on, we don't have all day.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We have things to do, Sue.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I just don't want ...

JULIANNA MARGULIES: As independent as I may become, the sad fact is that I will always need others to communicate and emotions are most difficult to talk about.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I don't want my life to be - be.

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Be.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I don't want my life to be in a hell because you're leaving.

SUE RUBIN: All right. All right. All right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So we're looking for people and we're going to get replacements, okay?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We're going to do the best we can, Sue.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It's getting too ...

SYNTHESIZED VOICE: Close.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It's getting too close.

SUE RUBIN: (unintelligible)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I know, I know, I know.

SUE RUBIN: Oh no.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Well, can you tell me what's up?

C-A-N Can. Y-O-U ...

SUE RUBIN: Later.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sue, if you need me to leave, you need to tell me that. Don't scream at me.

Can, Y-O-U, L-E-A-V-E M-E, can you leave me - A-L-O-N-E. Can you leave me alone? Yeah, I can leave you alone. Thank you for asking instead of yelling.

SUE RUBIN: All right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: All right. I'm going to go inside, then.

SUE RUBIN: Bye-bye.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See you later. You don't want to come in, you sure?

SUE RUBIN: Later.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Okay.

SUE RUBIN: Later.

JULIANNA MARGULIES: The last thing I want to clarify is no matter how much social interaction one has, one will never be free of autism. The tendencies to be and act certain ways may subside, but I will always be autistic.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

Search
© 2007 Cable News Network.
A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines. Contact us. Site Map.
Offsite Icon External sites open in new window; not endorsed by CNN.com
Pipeline Icon Pay service with live and archived video. Learn more
Radio News Icon Download audio news  |  RSS Feed Add RSS headlines